Attraction

Dudhsagar Falls

Dudhsagar Falls is a four-tiered waterfall located on the Mandovi River in the Indian state of Goa. It is 60 km from Panaji by road and is located on the Madgaon-Belagavi rail route about 46 km east of Madgaon and 80 km south of Belgaum. Dudhsagar Falls is amongst India's tallest waterfalls with a height of 310 m and an average width of 30 metres. The falls is located in the Bhagwan Mahaveer Sanctuary and Mollem National Park among the Western Ghats. The waterfall forms the border between Karnataka and Goa states. The area is surrounded by deciduous forests with rich biodiversity. The falls are not particularly spectacular during the dry season but during the monsoon season, however, the falls are fed by rains and form a huge force of water.

Aguada Fort

Fort Aguada is a well-preserved seventeenth-century Portuguese fort, along with a lighthouse, standing in Goa, India, on Sinquerim Beach, overlooking the Arabian Sea. The fort was constructed in 1612 to guard against the Dutch and the Marathas. It was a reference point for the vessels coming from Europe at that time. This old Portuguese fort stands on the beach south of Candolim, at the shore of the Mandovi River. It was initially tasked with defense of shipping and the nearby Bardez sub-district. A freshwater spring within the fort provided water supply to the ships that used to stop by. This is how the fort got its name: Aguada, meaning watery in the Portuguese language. Crews of passing ships would often visit to replenish their freshwater stores.

Anjuna Beach

Rocky shores, rocking music, and a free and happy vibe - That is Anjuna Beach for you. Located near Panjim at a distance of 21 km, it is among the most popular beaches in North Goa. A hippie paradise of sorts it is characterized by its rocky outcrops. Come and rock the night way at Curlies, or dance to some techno at Cafe Lilliput! During the day you can sample some delicious culinary goodness at Burger Factory, Baba Au Rhums, or Basilico. Known as the jewel of Ozran, it quickly became a favorite haunt for the hippies in the swingin' 60s and still retains the same vibe to this day. You are sure to meet an eclectic bunch of tourists from all over the world when you are here! Lose yourself in the trance music and immerse in the number of adventure sports at Anjuna. It is this variety of activities that makes Anjuna Beach one of the most popular beaches in Goa. Hwowever, beware of swimming here as the beach is mostly filled with rocky shores.

Calangute Beach

Situated 15 km from Panjim, Calangute Beach is the longest beach in North Goa, stretching from Candolim to Baga. Due to its sheer size and popularity, it is a hub for tourists and backpackers from all over the world. Popular as the "Queen of Beaches", the Calangute Beach of Goa is among the top ten bathing beaches in the world. Being one of the busiest and most commercial beaches of Goa, it is swarming with eating joints, shacks and clubs serving cocktails, beer and seafood. The Calangute Beach is also known for its water sports activities like parasailing, water surfing, banana ride and jet-skiing. While the days here are filled with beach fun, nights call for upbeat parties and letting your hair down. Calangute is also popular for staying in Goa as it keeps you well-connected to the other beaches in the north such as Baga, Anjuna, Candolim, Aguada and many more.

Chapora Fort

Chapora Fort, located in Bardez, Goa, rises high above the Chapora River. The site was the location of a fort built by Muslim ruler Adil Shah called Shahpura, whose name the Portuguese altered to Chapora. The fort changed hands several times after Portuguese acquired Bardez. Trying to end the Portuguese rule in Goa, Prince Akbar joined his father’s enemies, the Marathas in 1683 and made this place his base camp. It became the northern outpost of the Old Conquests. After the Portuguese recovered from an encounter with the Marathas, they strengthened their northern defenses and provided shelter to the people there. Across the Chapora river, the Hindu ruler of Pernem, the Maharaja of Sawantwadi who was an old enemy of the Portuguese held the fort for two years. The Portuguese came in 1717, and carried out extensive repairs of the fort, adding features like bastions and a tunnel that extended to the seashore and banks of the Chapora River for emergencies.

Dona Paula Beach

The air is filled with romance, stories, and legends of eternal love. You are in Dona Paula, which is, arguably, Goa's most enduring monument. If that was not enough, Dona Paula is also one of the most happening beaches in North Goa just seven kilometres away from Panaji. The Dona Paula beach also provides a magnificent view of the Mormugao harbour. This beautiful getaway is so called because of the statue of a man and woman perched on top of a rock. While various stories surround it, there is an undeniable charm to the mystery of the statue. All the legends speak of the passionate, forbidden, and unfulfilled love affair of Dona Paula with a local Goan man, while some say it was the Governor, others believe that it was a worker from a lower caste. Dona Paula is one Goa's must visit places and has captured the hearts of every tourist. It is the meeting point of the Zuari and Mandovi Rivers and is beautified by fronds of palm trees breaking the silvery shimmer of the beach sand.

Vagator Beach Road

If you are on the lookout for some revitalising beach holiday destinations in North Goa, the Vagator beach is just the place for you. The northernmost beach of Bardez Taluka, the Vagator beach is 21 kilometres from Panaji and is characterised by a combination of its soft white sands and imposing but beautiful rocky cliffs. The beach is divided into two major parts, namely Little Vagator, also known as Ozran Beach, and Big Vagator. While the sweeping view of the sea from the Vagator cliff is undoubtedly stunning, tourists also flock to Vagator for its myriad dining options and an overall upbeat vibe at the beach shacks and parties. Vagator has recently gained a place of preference in the hearts of tourists and travellers for its cuisine culture. One of the most famous places to be at is, of course, Thalassa - a quaint and artistic greek themed beach restaurant with beach seating and stunning gourmet adventures.

Arambol Beach

Beautiful and serene, Arambol Beach is among the best beaches of North Goa and is relatively unexploited by tourist activities. Considered to be one of the most spectacular beaches in Goa, Arambol beach has a distinct Bohemian feel to it, which attracts tourists from all over the world. Be it wellness pursuits at a Yoga class on the beach, a drum circle and a weekend beachside market at sunset, a mystical baba on top of a hillock, jumping off a cliff to paraglide or simply strolling about the kitschy market lanes; there is something for every soul in Arambol.
It is among the northernmost beaches in Goa and is bordered by Keri or Querim beach on one end and Morjim on the other. Arambol Beach is a rocky cum sandy beach blessed with jungles on one end and the sea on the other.

Colva Beach

The captivating Colva Beach, located in south Goa, 6 Km away from the city of Margao, is the most visited beach of Goa. Its 25 Km long coast, extending from Bogmalo in the north to Cabo de Rama in the south, has the powdery white sand and is flanked by swaying coconut trees that add to its beauty. It looks more stunning with shacks, nightclubs and souvenir stalls all around. The beach area also suggests the luxurious lifestyle of the elite class who owns striking houses or villas that speck the village. With the nonchalant ambience, mesmerizing view of the endless beach and spirited people, Colva Beach is perfect to feel life in its true sense. The engaging water sports like paragliding and banana boat rides will surely give you goosebumps. While the Colva Beach is serene for peace-lovers, it perks up at night for party-lovers. You should not miss out the dazzling nightlife of Colva.

Morjim Beach

Morjim Beach is undoubtedly one of the most tranquil beaches of North Goa and is located around 12 km away from Morjim through the Duler-Marna-Siolim Road. Located a little south of Aswem beach, it serves as a nesting habitat for Olive Ridley Turtles. This earns Morjim Beach another moniker, namely Turtle Beach. The nesting season for the Olive Ridley Turtles usually begins in September, although sometimes it can be as late as January, and lasts until March. Morjim is one of the three beach nesting sites on the Goan coastline, the other two being Agonda and Galgibaga in the South. Thus, this time of the year is a popular among tourists who wish to see the nesting. However, as Olive Ridley Turtles are an endangered species, Morjim Beach is a protected area on which beach parties and shacks are banned. The ones that exist are further away from the sea and do not play overtly loud music.